Bagobo-Tagabawa salvages a juvenile eagle amidst COVID19

While most of us are at home during this pandemic, a juvenile eagle was rescued by a Bagobo-Tagabawa while working as a front liner of Sibulan Hydropower Plant in Barangay Sibulan, Davao del Sur.

Renante Apal found a wild bird—identified to be a serpent eagle, while doing his errands on a Friday at Sibulan River. Apal is a member of Indigenous Peoples community and works as water guard to Hedcor’s Sibulan Hydropower plant.

“While I was at my workplace in one of the facilities of the powerplant, I noticed a bird near the river having trouble flying,” Apal narrated in vernacular. “With no hesitation, I took the bird and hydrated it with clean water, then fed it with chicken innards,” Apas furthered saying.

Since 2010, Hedcor has been enacting their biodiversity enhancement program  within Mt. Apo Natural Park in Sibulan, Sta Cruz, Davao del Sur. The organization has also been  assessing the effects of their environmental initiatives to the improvement of wildlife and biodiversity conservation in the said area.

“Sukad ni abot si Hedcor diri sa among lugar, gina panghimangnuan nami nila nga e report kung aduna mi mga mananap nga makita para marescue ug mabalik sa kalasangan nga buhi. (We’ve informed Hedcor whenever we find displaced wild animals so that they could be rescued and returned to their habitat well)”, Apal said. 

Hedcor immediately assisted Apal and brought the eagle to a local veterinary clinic. Operating four of its hydropower facilities in Davao del Sur, Hedcor has doubled as a neighbor and safekeeper of Mt. Apo’s wildlife and biodiversity for a decade  now.

After 3 days of giving immediate care, Apal released the eagle back to the wild.

Dr. Bo Puentespina, Hedcor’s wildlife veterinarian consultant said that the raptor’s ability to fly back to its habitat was a clear indicator that it was properly nursed back to health. 

Dr. Puentespina also commended the effectiveness of Hedcor’s wildlife education program among its team members and the local community.

“The locals really went through their agreed protocol of reporting [cases of wildlife rescue] and its condition. The protocol also of how to care for the rescued animal was followed,” shared Dr. Puentespina. 

“Slowly but surely, Hedcor’s education program is working. I’m happy that our efforts to educate Hedcor’s team members, as well as the locals, bore fruit,” he added.

The rescue of the Serpent Eagle is Hedcor’s third rescued raptor in the Sibulan area. In 2015,  a Pinsker’s Hawk-eagle was rescued by a local after being entangled in tree roots, while in 2017, a Southern Philippine Hawk-eagle was again rescued after being injured by a gang of crows.

While most of us are at home during this pandemic, a juvenile eagle was rescued by a Bagobo-Tagabawa while working as a front liner of Sibulan Hydropower Plant in Barangay Sibulan, Davao del Sur.

Renante Apal found a wild bird—identified to be a serpent eagle, while doing his errands on a Friday at Sibulan River. Apal is a member of Indigenous Peoples community and works as water guard to Hedcor’s Sibulan Hydropower plant.

“While I was at my workplace in one of the facilities of the powerplant, I noticed a bird near the river having trouble flying,” Apal narrated in vernacular. “With no hesitation, I took the bird and hydrated it with clean water, then fed it with chicken innards,” Apas furthered saying.

Since 2010, Hedcor has been enacting their biodiversity enhancement program  within Mt. Apo Natural Park in Sibulan, Sta Cruz, Davao del Sur. The organization has also been  assessing the effects of their environmental initiatives to the improvement of wildlife and biodiversity conservation in the said area.

“Sukad ni abot si Hedcor diri sa among lugar, gina panghimangnuan nami nila nga e report kung aduna mi mga mananap nga makita para marescue ug mabalik sa kalasangan nga buhi. (We’ve informed Hedcor whenever we find displaced wild animals so that they could be rescued and returned to their habitat well)”, Apal said. 

Hedcor immediately assisted Apal and brought the eagle to a local veterinary clinic. Operating four of its hydropower facilities in Davao del Sur, Hedcor has doubled as a neighbor and safekeeper of Mt. Apo’s wildlife and biodiversity for a decade  now.

After 3 days of giving immediate care, Apal released the eagle back to the wild.

Dr. Bo Puentespina, Hedcor’s wildlife veterinarian consultant said that the raptor’s ability to fly back to its habitat was a clear indicator that it was properly nursed back to health. 

Dr. Puentespina also commended the effectiveness of Hedcor’s wildlife education program among its team members and the local community.

“The locals really went through their agreed protocol of reporting [cases of wildlife rescue] and its condition. The protocol also of how to care for the rescued animal was followed,” shared Dr. Puentespina. 

“Slowly but surely, Hedcor’s education program is working. I’m happy that our efforts to educate Hedcor’s team members, as well as the locals, bore fruit,” he added.

The rescue of the Serpent Eagle is Hedcor’s third rescued raptor in the Sibulan area. In 2015,  a Pinsker’s Hawk-eagle was rescued by a local after being entangled in tree roots, while in 2017, a Southern Philippine Hawk-eagle was again rescued after being injured by a gang of crows.

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